RETHINK POWER

Piezo Energy Technologies

Do you use batteries in remote locations that can’t be accessed for replacement? Do you need to get power into locations where it can’t be delivered by electromagnetic means? Consider wireless recharging via ultrasound.



OUR TECHNOLOGY


OUR POWER, YOUR MEDICAL PRODUCT

Piezo Energy Technologies has developed an ultrasound technique to wirelessly transmit power into the human body to recharge batteries or provide direct power to active implanted medical devices.

Current methods have limitations that restrict them from use in many situations. Our ultrasound power technology overcomes these limitations and offers new possibilities that can improve patient health and quality of life.

CAPABILITIES

IMPLANTED DEVICES NEED POWER, AND MORE OF IT.

Increasing power needs for implanted devices that support new therapies, combined with advanced rechargeable battery chemistries, drive the interest in rechargeable (secondary) batteries in implanted medical devices.

The electromagnetic inductive coupling method for recharging of batteries has been under investigation and development for over 60 years . While the inductive coupling technique remains useful, it has its limitations; this is where UltraSound Electrical Recharging (USer™) comes into play.



CAPABILITIES

Ultrasound Electrical Recharging (USer™)

The first application of our technology has been to power implanted medical devices and charging protocols that require only a few Watts of power. (US 8,082,041).

High Power Ultrasound Transcutaneous Energy Transfer

This application provides ten to fifteen watts of power to heart assist devices, again using ultrasound to carry it wirelessly across the skin (US 8,974,366 ). The larger amounts of power require accurate alignment and management of heating using active or passive methods.





Differentiation from existing Inductive Rechargeable Systems

  • Deeper range of operation in tissue (10 – 50 mm)
  • Same production costs as existing technologies
  • Directed (“laser-like”) beam to charge the implanted Receiver
  • Avoidance of metal heating effects found in electromagnetic recharging devices.
  • Smaller charging module with higher current charging possible
  • Predictable tissue response upon exposure to unfocused ultrasound energy
  • MRI compatible Ultrasound Transmit-Receive construct
  • Avoidance of interference between different medical and non-medical devices using similar electromagnetic frequencies.

Milestones

2008 NIH Phase I award

2010 NIH Phase II award

2011 first patent issued
2012 first successful in vivo recharging

tests totaling 10 hours

2014 2nd NIH Phase I for miniaturization
2014 second patent issued

2017 third patent application published